Shenzhen Biennale inauguration!

Posted on December 17th, 2017 by Nicole Sakr

Posted under: Academic, Installations + Exhibitions, The Cooper Union

Read on Archdaily more about the Biennale HERE.

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100 International Architects of 2017

Posted on December 14th, 2017 by Nicole Sakr

Posted under: _Daniels Building, Awards, Events, Installations + Exhibitions

The Korean Institute of Architects named Katie and Nader among the world’s top 100 architects of 2017 with a special citation of the Daniels Building project for the University of Toronto. The project was part of an international exhibition recently held in Seoul.

 

 

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Shenzhen Biennale Teaser

Posted on December 9th, 2017 by Nicole Sakr

Posted under: Events, Installations + Exhibitions, The Cooper Union

The Shenzhen Bi-City Biennale is opening in five days! NADAAA, in collaboration with the Cooper Union has designed “Zhulang Huagai: A Figure for the Nantou Urban Village” which is currently under construction. A special thanks to Cooper Union students Margaux Wheelock-Shew and Jeremy Son for their work on this project. Also a special thanks to the Thornton Tomasetti team: Tian-Fang Jing, Walter Woodington, James Richardson, and Hauke Jungjohann.

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Domestic Tectonic: Translations Across Scales

Posted on May 22nd, 2017 by Lisa LaCharité

Posted under: Installations + Exhibitions, Lectures, Press

Nader Tehrani and Katie Faulkner presented the 2017 RISD Shoemaker Lecture on April 24, 2017 after the opening of the RISD Shoemaker Exhibit by NADAAA, Domestic Tectonic: Translations Across Scales, at the RISD BEB Gallery. Below is a summary and guide to the exhibit.

Domestic Tectonic occurs at a moment in our trajectory when the dialogue between research and practice has intertwined, not only in confluence, but in moments of friction when our design ambitions have not aligned with the possibilities of patronage, construction norms, or the fluctuations of the economy. The Rock Creek House, as such, does not so much represent the culmination of a form of thinking, but strategic compromise, reconciliation, and opportunism. The seeds for current thinking can be found in history, and many of the early works of both Office dA and NADAAA were houses. Taken together, the houses reveal not only speculation on the domestic realm, but also ways in which a small project may become an ‘amuse bouche’ for a larger construction.

Thus, we link the design and craft usually reserved for the scale of a home to the architecture of the very institutions that train the designers. Below are a few examples of these links as themes that stand out in our work: The first theme deals with the basic proposition of architectural composition in the context of typology, organization and configuration: each of these houses have explored the tensions between received conventions on the one hand –whether from history or the construction industry– and the idea of transformation and invention on the other. A second theme has transported each project into a research about the relationship between material units, their methods of assembly and the way in which means and methods might become transformative –formally, spatially, and technologically– as the basis for the production of new forms of knowledge. Thirdly, each project establishes some relationship with its site, if only as a reminder that architecture does not only operate in a vacuum, but also in a deeply entrenched relationship with its context, and hence a social, political and collective environment.

Below is an outline of the work included in the exhibit to provide a tour of the exhibition. The exhibition was organized around five episodes; each episode title is a link that provides additional information and context:

1 The Rock Creek House

 

 

As the centerpiece of the exhibit, the Rock Creek House represents the challenges of working with the infrastructure of an existing building, and how its history and embodied energy serves to advance an idea about resilience and preservation. At the same time, the project tests the limits of such a logic, radically transforming the southern side of the building to open it up to the landscape, framing broader views, letting in the sun, and consequently transforming the otherwise load-bearing brick wall into a curtain wall. The sectional excavations of the project are maybe its most transformative, effectively mining space out of an existing basement and attic to double the size of the house. Significant portions of existing brick were removed on the southern façade to make way for larger window sizes, and then subsequently recycled to expand the façade of the attic space: a conceptual cut and fill.

2 MOCK-UPS

 

 

The mock-ups in this exhibit are a key part of the research undertaken by NADAAA in collaboration with C.W. Keller & Associates to advance some of the material thinking of the project. Much of that thinking was aimed at organizing the house on the north-south grain of its structural walls and –with the insertion of diverse plywood elements– reinforcing that grain with the orientation of plywood laminations. These laminations then translate into butcher block stairs, picket railing, blank panel interior facades on the east-west grain, and a medium through which to organize all mechanical and electronic elements.

3- Tectonic Domestic Grid**

 

 

The grid of projects on the north-west corner of the gallery places this project in the context of other residential projects through which some of the key ideas have been iterated.

4 The Animations 

 

 

The projection wall brings the various projects into dialogue with each other through added images, and more importantly through animations that advance both the conceptual and experiential aims of each project.

5 The preface to the May 2016 issue of The Plan 

 

 

The preface to the May 2016 issue of The Plan is included as an introduction to the exhibit. It outlines some of our architectural preoccupations over the past years and how they have impacted the relationship between practice and pedagogy.

 

 

 

 

** Residences from left to right, top to bottom: Tongxian Art Center, Weston House, Newton House, Phoenix Residence, New Hampshire Retreat, Mill Road Residence, Dortoir Familial, Casa La Roca, House in New England

 

 

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NADAAA PRESENTS SHOEMAKER LECTURE & EXHIBITION AT RISD

Posted on April 24th, 2017 by Jalisa Joyner

Posted under: Installations + Exhibitions, Lectures

Today at 6:30 pm, Nader & Katie will present the RISD Shoemaker Lecture which complements ‘Domestic Tectonic: Translations Across Scales’, an exhibit on view until May 12th in the BEB gallery.  The lecture at Metcalf Auditorium, Chace Center will follow the opening reception of the exhibition in the BEB Gallery at 5:30 pm. The exhibition is free and open to the public.

DOMESTIC TECTONIC OCCURS AT A MOMENT IN OUR TRAJECTORY WHEN THE DIALOGUE BETWEEN RESEARCH AND PRACTICE HAS INTERTWINED, NOT ONLY IN CONFLUENCE, BUT IN MOMENTS OF FRICTION WHEN OUR DESIGN AMBITIONS HAVE NOT ALIGNED WITH THE POSSIBILITIES OF PATRONAGE, CONSTRUCTION NORMS, OR THE FLUCTUATIONS OF THE ECONOMY.  THE SEEDS FOR CURRENT THINKING CAN BE FOUND IN HISTORY, AND MANY OF THE EARLY WORKS OF BOTH OFFICE DA AND NADAAA WERE HOUSES. TAKEN TOGETHER, THE HOUSES REVEAL NOT ONLY SPECULATION ON THE DOMESTIC REALM, BUT ALSO WAYS IN WHICH A SMALL PROJECT MAY BECOME AN ‘AMUSE BOUCHE’ FOR A LARGER CONSTRUCTION.  THUS, WE LINK THE DESIGN AND CRAFT USUALLY RESERVED FOR THE SCALE OF A HOME TO THE ARCHITECTURE OF THE VERY INSTITUTIONS THAT TRAIN THE DESIGNERS.

Learn more HERE.

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‘ENTRELAC’ RECYCLED INTO BLANKETS FOR SYRIAN REFUGEES

Posted on January 31st, 2017 by Katie Faulkner

Posted under: Installations + Exhibitions, Things We Like

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With support from NADAAA, Raya Kassisieh and the Amman Design Week team took the initiative to recycle “Entrelac”, cutting and stitching it into blankets that were later distributed to Syrian refugees and Jordanian families.  The original installation, included in the week-long event during September 2016,  consisted of 300 kg of un-dyed wool, hand knit and hung from the roof structure of Amman’s Electric Hangar. The design team utilized computational modeling to determine an approximation of the knit fabric ‘structure,’ which was then hand-knit by a team of twenty Jordanian women. Grounded less in precise digital production than in hand-craft and garment-making, Entrelac was simply “scaled up” to dress its venue, slung from the the standing roof trusses, and draped gracefully onto the floor.

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Twenty-eight large knit strands were produced, which were hung from the existing structure and again woven in a traditional Palestinian single X, at a larger scale, to form an enclosure. 
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The craftswomen skillfully and carefully knit each strand of the exhibit in their homes and small workshops. This network of domestically scaled production allowed for Entrelac’s rapid installation within the Electric Hangar exhibition hall. 
 

The notion of the re-purposing the installation is at once humbling and inspiring –  humbling because most of us do so little in the face of this tragedy that we are able to proceed unaffected during the quotidian replay of our lives. Yet this small act reminds us that humanity exists as a chain of relationships; someone had an idea, called some friends, momentum was built, and Amman Design Week was launched.  Someone else had an idea to weave the yarn of Entrelac into a global story that ended in a gesture of humanitarian assistance.  No more difficult than most tasks architects balance on a regular basis.

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Thank you to Raya, Rana, Abeer, Sahel, and all of the others at Amman Design Week who remind us what it means to be both a designer and a human being.

More photos HERE.

©2016 Amman Design Week. Photo: Hareth Tabbalat

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Flashback Friday: La vache qui rit

Posted on December 16th, 2016 by Nicole Sakr

Posted under: Installations + Exhibitions, Things We Like

“La culture est un mouvement qui surprend, interpelle, enchante et dérange parfois. Sa richesse, sa diversité et son impertinence même sont le signe d’une société et d’une démocratie qui vibrent.”

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La vache qui rit, is the cow that laughs last… as he looks back at you in anamorphic projection. This is the biennial installation we did in Morroco in 2009, located in a former slaughterhouse as part of a greater effort to reinvent East Casablanca, transforming an abandoned structure into a cultural factory.

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ENTRELAC ON INTERIOR DESIGN MAG NEWS TODAY

Posted on November 29th, 2016 by Nicole Sakr

Posted under: Installations + Exhibitions, Press

Annie Block’s take on Amman Design Week — Read it here.

Amman-Interior-Design

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Entrelac featured in Wallpaper

Posted on September 23rd, 2016 by Nicole Sakr

Posted under: Installations + Exhibitions, Press

Our installaton ‘Entrelac’ is featured on Wallpaper HERE.

Entrelac-Wallpaper

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Queen Rania visits Entrelac

Posted on September 7th, 2016 by Nicole Sakr

Posted under: Events, Installations + Exhibitions

“Under the patronage of Queen Rania Al Abdullah, the annual event attempts to redraft global perceptions of the nation and support its growing creative class.”

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